How Often Change Snowblower Oil?

Changing engine oil is like plumbing, it can get messy and nobody looks forward to it. As a mechanic, I've done a ton of oil changes in my career, and I'm about to share a mess free easy way to change snowblower oil. You are welcome!

It is recommended to change snowblower engine oil at least once per season at the start of the season, or, every 50 hours of operation, which ever comes first. If your snowblower is new, oil should be changed after one month or 20 hours which ever comes first.

In this post you’ll learn when to change snowblower engine oil. You’ll also learn: a professional mess free way to remove engine oil; how to replace oil filter; oil type and quantity to use.

Mower gas cap

Vented Gas Cap

 Time To Change Engine Oil

Checking the oil is great and topping up oil between oil changes is acceptable practice.

However constantly topping up is not a substitute for an oil change. Engine contaminates like acids from gasoline and moisture that collects naturally inside the motor all contribute to oil contamination.

So although we may not use the snowblower a ton from season to season, the oil may still be contaminated.

Most manufacturers will advise snowblower owners to change the oil every 50 hours of operation or at the very least once per season. I like to change the oil at the start of the new season.

New snowblowers should get an oil change after just four weeks of operation or 20 hours. Changing the oil on a new engine helps the running in process. Fine metal particles associated with run in are best removed from the motor.

Symptoms of poor oil quality : Unfortunately poor engine oil quality doesn’t make itself known until it’s too late.

If you were very intune with your machine you may notice it runs a little hotter, not as smooth, nosier, less fuel efficient and less powerful. A black sludgy looking oil obviously screams change me but apart from the oil color, truthfully few of us would notice oil quality.

That said it is best to keep a record of the oil change date.

Checking Snowblower Engine Oil

The oil as you know should be checked regularly. Checking before starting is a great habit to develop. Checking and topping up oil between oil changes is acceptable practice.

However constantly topping up is not a substitute for an oil change. Engine contaminates like acids from gasoline and moisture that collects naturally inside the motor all contribute to oil contamination. So although we may not use the snowblower a ton from season to seasonthe oil may still be contaminated.

Many snowblowers are fitted with a fail safe low oil level switch. If the oil is critically low it won’t allow the engine start. But I would like to relay on it, best to check the oil.

I advise my customers to check at least every time they fill up the gas tank.

Checking the oil level is simple the process is as follows:

  • Park on level ground
  • Allow engine to cool
  • Located and remove dipstick
  • Wipe clean and reseat (do not thread home threaded dipsticks)
  • Remove and read stick
  • Upper stick mark identifies full
  • Lower stick marks low oil (below low is danger area)
  • Hatched area between full and low is an acceptable oil level
Mower gas cap

Vented Gas Cap

Mess free way to remove snowblower oil

This is as promised a mess free way to change your snowblower engine oil. You will however require a oil and gas syphon. The syphon is capable of extracting oil from the engine without removing the oil drain. You can check out the drain I use here on the “Snowblower maintenance tools page”.

Now this comes with the obvious drawback of now draining the engine completely, and some could argue that it may indeed leave behind some oil. It is for that reason, I recommend only using this method every second oil change.

The process is as follows:

  • Warm the engine
  • Shut down and remove dipstick
  • Feed oil extractor into dipstick tube and apply vacuum
Vented mower gas caps

Vented gas caps

replace snowblower oil filter

Not all snow blowers will have an oil filter fitted and so for many this section won’t apply.

Larger engine blowers generally have a oil filter. The cylindrical oil filter is located on the side of the engine and is removed by screwing it counterclockwise. However an oil filter tool is required.

The oil filter is changed every time the engine oil is changed, about every 50 hours of operation. Changing the filter is not challenging, the steps are as follows:

  • Remove the engine oil (drain or syphon)
  • Ready a suitable container and rags to catch oil filter spill
  • Loosen the filter using the tool (turn counterclockwise)
  • Unscrew by hand drain filter

Discarded the old filter, they aren’t reusable. Recycling centers will dispose of oil and filters.

Fit the new filter before adding engine oil. Before fitting the new filter, lube the O-ring seal. Lubing is important, it prevents pinching and oil leaks.

Snowblower oil type and quntity

Oil type is important, temperature plays a big part in oil type….

While a

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Auto Technician and Writer at Lawnmowerfixed | Website

John Cunningham is an Automotive Technician and writer on Lawnmowerfixed.com. I've been a mechanic for over twenty years, I use my knowledge and experience to write "How to" articles that help fellow gear-heads with all aspects of mechanical repairs, from lawn mowers to classic cars.