Chainsaw Parts & Tools

Chainsaws can be temperamental, and it’s the gas system that causes most problems. Saws, like all 2 stroke machines are finely tuned, any dirt or bad gas in the system can make them so frustrating to use.

Symptoms such as no starts, bogging, stalling, hot starting issues, surging and the list goes on. Bad gas is the root cause of many problems, the gas basically goes stale inside the saw and gum’s up the carburetor.

The solution is to remove the carburetor, clean and refuel. But often this won’t even work and you’ll need to replace the gaskets or the whole carburetor.

You can avoid lots of these issues by simply using a gas stabilizer in the fuel system. I have a quality gas stabilizer listed below.

To use it, simply mix it with the gas/oil mix. You’ll note the gas stabilizer isn’t a replacement for 2 stroke oil. The stabilizer keeps your gas fresh and protects the fuel system from gumming.

On this page you’ll find useful tools and products I use when repairing and tuning a chainsaw.

Order parts direct from a diagram. MTD supply parts for many brands: Troy-Bilt, Remington and Craftsman. Check out MTD’s easy order parts link below.

Damaged mower stone cover

Tools of the trade

Safety gear I recommend every lawnmower operator should wear to help protect eyes, ears, hands and lungs.

Some of the pictures on this page link to Amazon.com where you can check price and delivery of productsWe are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.


Gas stabilizer

Mix this with the gas when winterizing your small engine. Gas isn't what it used to be, it goes stale, in some cases after just one month. Bad gas causes gumming and that's a carburetor killer. Stabilizer will save you money and stress in the long run. Picture links to Amazon.com

WD carb cleaner

When cleaning your carburetor you'll need this stuff. Gumming is a sticky substance that's hard to shift. The carb cleaner will remove it, however if your carb is really bad, save yourself some work, go ahead and buy a new carburetor. Picture links to Amazon.com

Gas/oil extractor

You'll find this tool really useful if you need to drain the gas tank, and you will if the gas is stale. The siphon will remove it without fuss or mess and it can be used for extracting the oil too. Picture links to Amazon.com

Jet cleaners

You'll find these nylon brushes super useful when it comes time to clean those tiny passageways of the carburetor and jet. Use these in conjunction with the WD Carb cleaner. Picture links to Amazon.com

Carb adjusters

You'll find most carburetors have an exotic looking adjuster, that's because they don't want you to turn them. So you'll need a special screwdriver. This set covers the popular ones. Picture links to Amazon.com

Fits Stihl

Savior carburetor fits various Stihl models, check sellers list. Replaces WT286 carbs. Comes complete with mounting gaskets, manifold, gas lines both feed and return, gas filter, air filter and plug. Picture links to Amazon.com

Fits Poulan

Hipa carburetor fits various models of Poulan, but check the sellers list of models. This carburetor comes complete with mounting gaskets, both feed and return gas lines, primer bulb, gas filters, air filter and spark plug. Picture links to Amazon.com

fits Husqvarna

Podoy carburetor fits various models of Husqvarna saws, check sellers model list. Comes complete with mounting gaskets, fuel line, gas filter and air filter. Picture links to Amazon.com

Carb rebuild kit

Hipa carburetor rebuild kit fits many of the popular WA and WT carburetors. Check your carburetor model number. The kit does not contain mounting gaskets, (carburetor to engine) but contains all internal carb gaskets including needle valve, lever arm and welch plugs. Picture links to Amazon.com

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Auto Technician and Writer at Lawnmowerfixed | Website

John Cunningham is an Automotive Technician and writer on Lawnmowerfixed.com. I've been a mechanic for over twenty years, I use my knowledge and experience to write "How to" articles that help fellow gear-heads with all aspects of mechanical repairs, from lawn mowers to classic cars.